Youth Photo Treasure Hunt

Youth Photo Treasure Hunt

This is a simple check list that could be used for a group photo treasure hunt. We used it with our boys’ group. Many of them had recently been displaced from their homes by the housing department and it was a good way to explore some of their feelings and emotions associated with the move. It’s also a fun activity that allows you do something a bit different and get out of your group meeting room for 30-40 mins. Each of the photos should be agreed upon by the group. If there is a disagreement, take a photo of each thing and discuss it after the hunt. A photo of a human pyramid A photo of something green A photo of something living A photo of something blue A photo of something old A photo of something new Something that you think is positive Something that you this is negative Something that you think is hopeful Something that you this is useful Something that you think is dangerous Something that you think is exciting Something that you think is scary A photo of history A photo of the...
Group Builder Games and Activities

Group Builder Games and Activities

Around the world   The leader begins by saying the name of any country, city, river, ocean or mountain that can be found in an atlas. The young person next to him must then say another name that begins with the last letter of the word just given. Each person has a definite time limit (e.g. three seconds) and no names can be repeated. For example – First person: London, Second Person: Niagara Falls, Third Person: Switzerland Supermarket The first player says: “I went to the supermarket to buy an Apple (or any other object you can buy in a supermarket that begins with an A). The next player repeats the sentence, including the “A” word and adds a “B” word. Each successive player recites the sentence with all the alphabet items, adding one of his own. For example; ‘I went to the supermarket and bought an Apple, Banana, CD, dog food, envelopes, frozen fish’. It’s not too hard to reach the end of the alphabet, usually with a little help! Watch out for ‘Q’ and ‘X’ Tall stories The leader starts a story with a sentence that ends in SUDDENLY. The next person then has to add to the story with his own sentence that ends in SUDDENLY. Continue the story until everyone has contributed. The story becomes crazier as each young person adds their sentence. Tape it and play it back. For example; ‘Yesterday I went to the zoo and was passing the elephant enclosure when SUDDENLY…..’ Once upon a time Ask each young person to think of either the name of a person, a place or...
Children’s Session – One in heart and mind

Children’s Session – One in heart and mind

Working together: One in heart and mind John 17: 1-11 This is a collection of games and activities looking at teamwork and the benefits of working together. It is based on the John 17:1-11 reading and would be ideal for church based children’s groups. Game: Atomic Waste Everyone has to work together to get the balls from one bucket into the other without spilling. Tie enough rope to one bucket for each person in the team/group. Add 4 or 5 balls to that bucket. Set it next or across the room from the empty bucket. On ‘GO’ everyone grabs a string and works together to get the balls from one bucket to the other without touching anything but their own string. What were the challenges? What roles did each person take? If you were to do the challenge again is there anything you would do differently? Game: Minefield Scatter cones, hula hoops, foam blocks, balls and other soft items on the ground. Divide the players into even teams and give each team a blindfold. When you say, “Race,” each team will put the blindfold on one player and his team must guide him through the minefield by verbal communication only. If he touches an object, he must go back to the start line. The participants will learn it is best to have one player help guide him to the other side. After he makes it to the other side, he must take off the blindfold and run it back to another player on his team. The first team to get all of its players across the minefield wins the race. What...
The Raft Communication Session

The Raft Communication Session

The Raft Session This session is used to facilitate communication, to increase team-building skills and to bring out to the forefront people’s attitudes and values Give one worksheet to each participant and get them to read the instructions. They have to decide who they would take on the raft and why. Once they have completed the task  bring the participants together in groups of 3 or 4 and as a group they decide who the survivors are. In all likelihood this will require the young people to discuss and negotiate. The group all have to be in agreement. It may be helpful to tease out the labels the young people focus on in their decision making. Do they see the positive or negative label  e.g the doctor who is also a drug addict. What assumptions are made about each of the people? How do the young people determine each person on the shipwrecks worth? Will anyone not on the boat be affect by the decisions?   ****** The Raft A ship is wrecked in the middle of the ocean, thousands of miles from land. There are no immediate chances of rescue. 15 people are still alive and they manage to make a raft; because of the lack of time and equipment, the raft is only big enough to support 9 survivors. You have to decide which 6 of those listed you have to dispose of, you are not one of the survivors, and no one is allowed to hang onto the raft. A crippled boy, paralysed since birth.  The boy cannot use his hands, must be fed by others because he...