Youth Bible Study – Suffering (Job 1:1-22)

Youth Bible Study – Suffering (Job 1:1-22)

Opening Activity We have all wondered why we endure suffering, but there are no easy answers. However, sometimes it is our questions that are more interesting than our answers. Have these riddles written on sheets of paper or card and try one at a time with your group. If there are any answers the group cannot get, you could hold off until the end of the session before revealing them. Riddle 1. There are three men in a boat with four cigarettes but no matches. How do they manage to smoke? Answer: They throw one cigarette overboard and made the boat a cigarette lighter. Riddle 2. What is it that’s always coming but never arrives? Answer: Tomorrow. Riddle 3. What can travel around the world while staying in a corner? Answer: A stamp. Riddle 4. What gets wetter and wetter the more it dries? Answer: A towel. Riddle 5. Paul’s height is six feet, he’s an assistant at a butcher’s shop and wears size 9 shoes. What does he weigh? Answer: Meat. As an alternative activity, why not try The Impossible Quiz if you have access to a laptop with an internet connection. You can find it here http://theimpossiblequiz.org.uk/. Scripture Reading and Discussion Read Job 1:1-22. It is significant that the author starts by explaining what is happening behind the scenes. From our perspective the idea the suffering that Job experiences is a result of a wager between God and the Accuser is uncomfortable. But at the time of the story the common belief was that suffering was the direct result of sin or wickedness in your life. The...
Difficult Questions About Jesus

Difficult Questions About Jesus

This video has quite a few different applications. It could be used as an introduction to a discussion about the questions we all have about faith and religion. Or it could be used to help volunteers consider how children understand the stories in the Bible and how we can teach in their language rather than ours. What’s more important…our questions or our answers? You can become a patron of Children & Youth through Patreon. In return for your monthly support, we offer first access to a range of youth and children’s work resources. Thank you for being part of the C&Y...
Where is God Art Project

Where is God Art Project

Where is God Art Project Where’s Wally? This is a good way to introduce the idea of searching. It’s not always easy to see God but he is to be found very much in the midst of our lives. There are a number of books that can be purchased through an online retailed such as Amazon. Imagination Worksheet You could give each child a worksheet or use larger sheets of paper (one square per sheet of paper). This is to create space early on in the session to allow children to express their creativy. Emphasis that everyone sees differently and their responses might well be different. ImaginationWorkoutGamePrintable Creative Drawing Idea This is an alternative introductory activity. Gather together some toy catalogues, brochures or instruction booklets you don’t mine cutting up. Cut out some images that are full of action and glue them to individual sheets of paper. (You want it to look unfinished so the children want to finish the picture). Invite the children to finish of the pictures. See the gallery below for some ideas… Photo-dash Before the session write each of the questions on a large sheet of paper. Split the children into two teams and have them race against each other. Print out the photos and place them at the top of the hall. The children have to choose the photo that best represents their answer to the question. Print out a selection of words to use for the last question. Make sure to leave come blank cards for children to write their own words. Where can you find God? What would God say to you? Choose an emoticon and fill in the speech bubble....
Activity: Moral Dilemma

Activity: Moral Dilemma

Moral Dilemma Scenario In Europe, a woman was near death from cancer. One drug might save her, a form of radium that a druggist in the same town had recently discovered. The druggist was charging $2,000, ten times what the drug cost him to make. The sick woman’s husband, Heinz, went to everyone he knew to borrow the money, but he could only get together about half of what it cost. He told the druggist that his wife was dying and asked him to sell it cheaper or let him to sell it cheaper or let him pay later. But the druggist said, “No.” The husband got desperate and broke into the man’s store to steal the drug for his wife. Should the husband have done that? Why? After the reading, the first step involves identifying and clarifying the dilemma. To do this the participants must clarify their own notions of justice. This also might be the first opportunity for many young people to think about issues, which they have heard but not really thought about. The second step involves reading the first part of the first question to the participants. “Should Heinz steal the drug?” The young people are asked to form three groups according to their answers: Those who think Heinz should steal the drug, those who think he should not, and those who cannot decide. Grouping helps young people feel comfortable since it is easier to develop a sense of trust and cooperation in small groups. There can be more than one group within each group according to the number of students in the room. Next,...
Getting to know you game

Getting to know you game

Getting to know you Game This is a good introductory game that I’ve used with my school behaviour groups in the opening weeks. I’ve also used it with various youth groups as a good way for everyone to get to know each other. I also turn it into a game to see who can remember each others answers at the end of the session. Instructions Write the questions below on cards or you can  make up your own. Place the cards face down.  Explain how each card has a question on the reverse.  Each person will have a turn to pick a card and answer a question. Answer each question as honestly as possible. If there is a question that any of the participants feel uncomfortable with, you can say “pass” and pass it onto the other person, who can also say “pass”. All answers can be discussed depending on how long you have for the meeting.   Write the following questions on cards What do you do best? What sort of TV programmes do you like best? Which ones do you watch every week? If you won a £1000 – what would you spend it on? What do you like best about school/work? What has been your happiest moment so far? If you were someone else who would you be? What has pleased you most today? What do you think you will be doing in 10 years time? I get nervous when? What scares you most? What makes you laugh most? What embarrasses you? When was the last time you cried? What angers you? One of my favourite childhood memories...