Privilege Object Lesson

Privilege Object Lesson

This is a simple, powerful exercise to teach your group about privilege and how God wants us to use our talents, gifts and energy to help those who don’t have the same opportunities as we do. Set up chairs in rows and give each member of your group a scrap piece of paper and asked them to crumple it up. Use a bin/bucket as a target and move it to the front of the room. Say, “The game is simple — you all represent the country’s population. And everyone in the country has a chance to become successful and thrive.” (For anyone who is successful in landing their throw in the bin you could offer a prize.) “All you have to do is throw your scrunched-up paper into the bin while sitting in your seat.” The young people in the back rows will complain about how unfair the challenge is and how those in front of them have a much better chance. Allow everyone to take their shot – and allow young people to continue to complain. Conclude by saying, “The closer you were to the recycling bin, the better your odds. This is what privilege looks like. Did you notice how the only ones who complained about fairness were in the back of the room?” “By contrast, people in the front of the room were less likely to be aware of the privilege they were born into. All they can see is 10 feet between them and their goal.” “God wants us to be aware of our privilege; all the opportunities, talents and abilities we have. Not only...
Activity: Moral Dilemma

Activity: Moral Dilemma

Moral Dilemma Scenario In Europe, a woman was near death from cancer. One drug might save her, a form of radium that a druggist in the same town had recently discovered. The druggist was charging $2,000, ten times what the drug cost him to make. The sick woman’s husband, Heinz, went to everyone he knew to borrow the money, but he could only get together about half of what it cost. He told the druggist that his wife was dying and asked him to sell it cheaper or let him to sell it cheaper or let him pay later. But the druggist said, “No.” The husband got desperate and broke into the man’s store to steal the drug for his wife. Should the husband have done that? Why? After the reading, the first step involves identifying and clarifying the dilemma. To do this the participants must clarify their own notions of justice. This also might be the first opportunity for many young people to think about issues, which they have heard but not really thought about. The second step involves reading the first part of the first question to the participants. “Should Heinz steal the drug?” The young people are asked to form three groups according to their answers: Those who think Heinz should steal the drug, those who think he should not, and those who cannot decide. Grouping helps young people feel comfortable since it is easier to develop a sense of trust and cooperation in small groups. There can be more than one group within each group according to the number of students in the room. Next,...
The Chocolate Trade Game

The Chocolate Trade Game

Fair Share Assign everyone in the group a role in the cocoa-trading chain. (Farmer, Cocoa buyers, Importer, Chocolate company, Shops, Government.) Discuss what might be involved at each stage in the production of chocolate. Ask each group to decide how much of the cost of a chocolate bar (£1) should come to them. Each group then presents their suggestions. Add up the total. The total is likely to exceed £1, in which case each group should rethink their costs and suggest another figure. Give them the actual amounts (contained on info sheet) and discuss how each group feels. Is it fair? The Chocolate Trade Game Before the game: Introduce the subject of the cocoa trading chain by talking about chocolate. How many of the group eat chocolate and why? How much do they eat? How many of the group don’t eat chocolate and why? Think of words to describe chocolate, such as delicious or creamy. Ask children what they think chocolate is made of. Talk about the ingredients. Divide the group into 10 teams and assign roles. Explain that they will be taking part in a game about buying and selling chocolate. The facilitator should note the season cards and at the appropriate time has to read these out. The game will take an hour to play. How to Play the Game : Chocolate Game Instructions Role Play Cards: Chocolate Game Role Play Follow Up Discussion Which group made the most money? Ask the journalists to report back on what they saw happening during the game. Ask each group what their biggest problem was. Did anyone join with another group? Who...
World Cup and Street Children

World Cup and Street Children

“Sometimes it is hell on the streets but when I play football I feel as if I am in heaven” (Thamires, Brazil team 2010) With the World Cup taking place in Brazil this summer it is an excellent opportunity to use the competition to introduce the topic of street children around the world. Introduction In groups of 3 ask children to find the following countries as quickly as they can on a map of the world (using an atlas or maps/globes): South Africa, Brazil, Egypt, Kenya, Nicaragua, Philippines, Ukraine, Tanzania and Mauritius. Ask the children what they think these countries have in common (they all have teams going to the next Street Child World Cup in Brazil in 2014). Tell the children that in 2010 a special football World Cup was held for street children in South Africa. Children came from all over the world to play football and to be given a chance to speak out for children living on the streets. Show the following 2 minute films ‘More Than A Game’ and ‘The Road to Rio’ looking back to Street Child World Cup in 2010 and looking forward to Rio 2014. http://www.childrenandyouth.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/More-than-a-Game-Street-Child-World-Cup.mp4 http://www.childrenandyouth.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Join-us-on-the-Road-to-Rio.mp4 Discussion Show your group images of children that are living on the streets and ask them to create two lists. On the first list write words that sum up some of the negative emotions children in these photos might experience and on the second list write some of the positive emotions children living on the streets might experience (e.g. feeling part of a community, feeling strong…) You could also use the following case studies to help...