Still Game: Community and Compassion

Still Game: Community and Compassion

Assembly – Community and Compassion Like many people I was excited to hear that Still Game will be returning to our TV screens for another new series. The last series of the Craiglang Comedy drew record viewing figures of around 3.2million across the UK. Many have attempted to explain the success of the show but for me it’s to do with the strength of community and the bond between the characters. There’s something about the way Jack, Victor, Isa, Tam, Winston and the gang treat one another. Even in amongst all the banter. Here’s a few clips… I think Lorraine Kelly summed it up really well when she spoke about the community spirit and everyone looking out for one another. If you’ve ever seen an episode you’ll know that there at times when not all the characters get on with one another…Winston trying to fast forward Isa to the point of her story, Jack and Victor burning Boaby the barman. But when the chips are down and things get difficult everyone in Craiglang is there for one another; there is more that unites them that divides them. And that’s true for all of us that are part of this community. If we pay attention to one another we recognise that. Being present and paying attention to one another opens us to true compassion. Sometimes we can think of compassion as a gift that we either have or we don’t. If we haven’t we’re out of luck. Or we can think of compassion as some kind of emotional reaction that spontaneously erupts out of us…like we have no control over...
Assembly: How not to be compassionate

Assembly: How not to be compassionate

I’m aware that sometimes teachers/chaplains/youth workers stand up in front of young people and tell them all the things they should be doing. Today’s assembly was on compassion so I took the opportunity to be honest about how difficult doing the right thing can be. Rather than presenting myself as someone with all the answers I think it’s healthy to be upfront that even as someone employed by the church I find some of Jesus’ most basic commands about loving others and being non-judgmental incredibly difficult. What follows is a story about a recent trip to New York and some of the people I encountered there that formed the basis of a short school reflection… When I visited New York in January it felt like I spent most of my time on the Metro. You sure find some interesting characters on the underground – you never know who we’re walking past! Most of the time you try keep your head down and pretend they’re not there; all in the hope that you get to your destination without any bother. This was my experience in Manhattan. “I’m the New York Candy Man,” he bellowed. A young entrepreneur holding a box offering a selection of chocolate, Oreos and M&Ms explained eloquently that he was trying to help fund his studies.  No one flinched or looked up from their kindles and IPad’s. America has an incredibly expensive education system – this is how the Candy Man finds the money to pay his way through school. On another trip a man in a wheelchair shared his story about how his health bills caused him and his family to lose their house. A woman reached over offering...
Assembly: Compassion

Assembly: Compassion

Introductory Reflection Compassion – Click for Powerpoint Slides. Show these when the pupils begin to gather before the assembly. Video: Connor’s Story   Some thoughts To be compassionate we start with what we have to give where we are – in the video the wrestlers simply gave their time and their attention. Compassion isn’t about some outlandish or overly generous thing that we do – but it starts just by turning up. I thought what Connor’s story also showed is that often we can make the mistake of thinking that when we show compassion we’re giving something to someone else. But a lot of the time we receive something back that is far greater. I guess it’s easy to look around and thing about everything we don’t have. It can be hard keeping up sometimes…latest phone, the most fashionable clothes, or the latest must have item. But when we encounter something like Connor, when we show compassion we’re reminded of all that we do have. All the small stuff that’s all too easy to overlook. So as a school community, and individually what are our opportunities to show compassion? What are the situations that we can make a difference just by turning up? And what might we receive in return when we show compassion? You can become a patron of Children & Youth through Patreon. In return for your monthly support, we offer first access to a range of youth and children’s work resources. Thank you for being part of the C&Y...
Children’s Session: Jesus heals a leper

Children’s Session: Jesus heals a leper

I wonder if you’ve ever felt left out?Matthew 8: Jesus Heals a Leper Jesus showed us who God is by touching the untouchable and loving those who were often feared and rejected. Group Mandala Have each child and volunteer draw around their hands on the circle of card using the chalk. Encourage the children to take some time to think about how they feel this morning and what colours/images match those feelings.  They can add their design to the inside of their hand outlines. Once they’ve done that ask what feelings/images/colours come to mind when they think about being part of this group. They use these to fill the remaining space between each of the hands. Selection of First Aid Quizzes Quiz 1 Quiz 2 Quiz 3 Garden Dangers First Aid Risky Business First Aid Game: Operation During the session explain that in Biblical times Leprosy was a word for all kinds of skin diseases. These diseases were not like having the common cold! Some of them were contagious and eventually led to paralysis, loss of body parts, and even death. In Jesus’ culture, people who had leprosy were viewed as filth and unacceptable. Hey had to wear torn clothing and announce themselves whenever they encountered people. By law they had to be completely separate from family the community. Game: No Touching Allowed What if, like people with leprosy, we couldn’t touch anyone else? Our lives would be very different, and sometimes quite challenging. Pair children, and give each pair an orange. Have the pair place the orange between their foreheads and then try to walk to the opposite end...