Anti-Bullying Session

Anti-Bullying Session

Anti-Bullying

Why do people bully? An anti-bullying session plan for use with school pupils or youth groups looking at effective ways of responding to bullying.

On two separate sheets of flipchart paper draw an outline of a person. Label one ‘Victim’ and the other ‘Bully’.

Post-It Notes Discussions

  1. Why are people bullied? Encourage young people to write their answers on post-it notes and get them to place them around the outline of the victim. Feedback the range of answers back to whole group.
  1. How does someone who is bullied feel?Encourage young people to write  answers on post-it notes which are then placed inside the outline of the victim. Again feedback answers to the whole group.
  1. What are the characteristics of a bully? On post-it notes participants write down their answers and these are placed around the outline of the bully. Feedback answers to the whole group.
  1. Why do people bully others? Young people again write their answer on post-its which are then placed inside the outline of the bully. Answers fed back to whole group.

 

antibullying

 

Group Discussion
Ask participants if there are any similarities between the victim and bully. (Both may experience the same feelings as each other). Also stress that not all bullies are just ‘nasty’, the bully may have underlying issues that need to be addressed which is another reason to report any bullying

  • Split the participants into groups and have them read ‘My bullying story’. Once they have done this get them to answer the attached questions on flip chart paper. Choose which story to use depending on your own context.

Once the task is completed have all the groups feedback their answers and as a whole group decide which responses would help the situation most.


My bullying story (school)

Read the below story and answer the questions that follow:

I started a new school and to begin with I really liked it. After a few weeks someone in my class started picked on me. They called me nasty names like scruff and smelly and even though most of the others were nice to me in class they wouldn’t talk to me at break or dinner time. I think it was because they were scared that they would get picked on too.

I tried to make friends so that they would see that I was ok really but they just ignored me if I tried to talk to them.

Then this person started doing things like kicking the balls at me on purpose when I walked past in the playground or tripping me up when we had PE.

No one ever stuck up for me even though they knew it was happening.

It made me really sad and lonely

1. What should the victim do?

2. What should the other young people do?

What should the school staff do?

My bullying story (other settings)

Read the below story and answer the questions that follow:

I had started a new school and after a few weeks someone in my class told me about the local youth club and said I should go along. From the first week I went there was a group that picked on me – some of them were in the year above me at school.

They called me names like dog breath and mingan, even though most of the other members were alright with me they wouldn’t talk to me when any of this group were around – I think it was because they were scared that they would get picked on too.

I tried to join in with things so that they would see that I was ok really but they just ignored me if I tried to talk to them.

Then they started doing things like kicking the balls at me on purpose when I walked past. There was a graffiti wall at the youth club and they started writing stuff about me and my family saying we were scrubbers and making up stuff that we’d been kicked out of our old house and that was the only reason we were in the area.

After a couple of months, even though I’d made a few friends I decided to stop going to the club.

Nothing I was doing to make them like me was working – it just wasn’t worth the hassle.

1. What should the victim do?

2. What should the other young people do?

3. What should the youth worker do?

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